Focusing on organic job growth in communities statewide.

 

It’s a hard lesson some communities must learn along the way. A big company leaves, and with it jobs. Hopes of a new employer coming to town are dashed by intense competition and deep pockets. In need of work, people move away, and when they do, the very soul of the community withers and wastes away. But there is a way to retain that intellectual wealth and economic vitality. By focusing on entrepreneurship and small business growth, communities can flourish organically, creating jobs, filling empty storefronts and keeping future generations engaged and in residence.

Spearheaded by the Washington State Department of Commerce, the state’s Startup Washington strategy is designed to strengthen communities by through the cultivation and retention of economic and intellectual wealth. It has not only gained the support of local economic developers, but is part of Governor Inslee’s long-term economic development efforts to create more quality jobs statewide.

Our goal with Startup Washington is to re-energize these communities and businesses with the entrepreneurial spirit, whether they are large or small. Technology allows people to live and work where they want to these days and it is Startup’s goal to  provide the tools, resources, education and training needed to start, grow and expand a business anywhere in the state. Entrepreneurship is not just about education; it’s about successful adulthood.

 

Maury’s Message

Books to Read

An interview with…

So you probably think this blog is about me.

I gave a lot of thought about what I should write about this month. There seems to be no shortage of topics to cover about economic development and entrepreneurship. But I feel that over the last two years I may have covered most of the subjects people beside me would... read more

Those who can’t follow, lead.

I’ve been thinking a lot about leadership lately. It’s not necessarily my fault. Hardly a day goes by when we’re not bombarded with the latest notions and pseudo-epiphanies about what a leader should or shouldn’t be. Last year alone, almost 1,500 paperbacks were published with the word “leadership” in the title. If I did my math correctly (and don’t count on it), that works out to four new books a day being published. For its part, Amazon lists 57,136 books on the subject of leadership. There’s so much content out there, in fact, that you could dedicate your entire life learning how to be a leader instead of just being one.

Which leads me to wonder…

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Startup Wisdom: 27 Strategies for Raising Business Capital

So, consider: a handful of industries have driven the economy for more than 200 years. Ever since the industrial revolutions began rolling through the 18th and 19th centuries, petroleum, manufacturing, chemicals, natural resources and raw materials, banking, transportation, versions of communication technologies, weapons and real estate have been clustered at the top of the list, with business and political leaders looking out for each other.  With centuries-old competition like that, what is a contemporary under-capitalized start-up to do?  Find new access to capital, of course. Private investments have been stagnant for more than half a century and since 2008 banks, under intense scrutiny, are refusing to risk getting busted for making poor investments. Today’s innovative models are so new – most of them just a few years old – that they are still in quick-mode evolution. Fundraising ideas have never been so important or so available but they need to be better understood; millions of Google hits don’t really help.

 

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Rebecca Lovell

When you think of entrepreneurs, you think of people with vision, passion, perseverance, resourcefulness and open mindedness. Rebecca Lovell has all those qualities and more. That is one reason why she was chosen to lead a team that drives the Seattle sector strategy, with a goal of making it the most innovative and equitable place to start and grow a business. I have been an admirer of her work for years and have modeled much of my entrepreneurship state programs after her work. Prior roles include the City’s first Startup Advocate, Program Director for Alliance of Angels, Executive Director of Northwest Entrepreneur Network, Chief Business Officer for GeekWire and adjunct instructor on venture capital investing for the UW Foster MBA Program. She brings 20 years of operating and management experience to her leadership roles in both for-profit and non-profit sectors, was recognized as one of the top 100 women in Tech from the Puget Sound Business Journal, and Tech Flash’s “Do Gooder of the Year,” and currently serves as a mentor for 9Mile Labs and Techstars.

read the interview…

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